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Dental Fear in Children: Brought on by parents?

September 23rd, 2020

A study conducted in Washington State in 2004 and another conducted in Madrid, Spain in 2012 both reported findings that support a direct relationship between parents’ dental fear and their child’s fear of the dentist.

The Washington study examined dental fear among 421 children ages 0.8 to 12.8 years old. They were patients at 21 different private pediatric dental practices in western Washington state. The Spanish study observed 183 children between the ages of seven and 12 as well as their parents.

The Washington study used responses from both parents and the Dental Sub-scale of the Child Fear Survey Schedule. The survey consisted of 15 questions, which invited answers based on the child’s level of fear. The scale was one to five: one meant the child wasn’t afraid at all, and five indicated he or she was terrified. The maximum possible points (based on the greatest fear) was 75.

Spanish researchers found a direct connection between parental dental fear levels and those among their kids. The most important new discovery from the Madrid study was that the greater the fear a father had of going to the dentist, the higher the level of fear among the other family members.

Parents, but especially fathers, who feared dental procedures appeared to pass those fears along to every member of the family. Parents can still have some control over fear levels in their children. It is best not to express your own concerns in front of kids; instead, explain why going to the dentist is important.

Drs. Clair Miller, Leah Gully, and Kathryn Sandilands and our team work hard to make your child’s visit at our Edmonton, AB office as comfortable as possible. We understand some patients may be more fearful than others, and will do our best to help ease your child’s anxiety.

Common Causes of Gum Disease

September 16th, 2020

Your gums are responsible for a large part of your overall oral health. So keeping them healthy and knowing how to detect gum disease is extremely important.

Since it’s often painless, gum disease may go unnoticed and can progress when left untreated. Understanding the causes of gum disease will give you the ability to keep your oral health in great shape:

  • Bacteria and Plaque. Good hygiene helps remove bacteria and plaque from teeth. When plaque is not removed, it turns into a rock-like substance called tartar, which can only be removed by a dentist.
  • Smoking and Tobacco. Smokers and tobacco users put themselves at a higher risk of developing gum disease. Tobacco use can also stain your teeth, give you bad breath, and increase the risk of oral cancer. It’s best to avoid using tobacco altogether.
  • Certain Medications. Ironically, certain medications for other health conditions can increase your risk of developing gum disease. Talk with Drs. Clair Miller, Leah Gully, and Kathryn Sandilands if you have concerns about a medication you are taking. Steroids, anti-epilepsy drugs, certain cancer therapy medications, and oral contraceptives can be among the culprits.
  • Medical Conditions. Certain medical conditions can also affect your gum health. Diabetics can have an increased risk of gum disease due to the inflammatory chemicals in their bodies. Talk to our team about your health condition so we can take that into account when treating you.

Luckily, there are actions you can take to prevent gum disease. You should make regular visits to our Edmonton, AB office for regular cleanings. It’s also worthwhile to maintain good hygiene habits at home, such as flossing and brushing at least two times every day.

Good oral hygiene practice and visits to our Edmonton, AB office can help you eliminate or reduce the risks of developing gum disease!

How to Handle a Dental Emergency

September 9th, 2020

Whether it’s a broken tooth or injured gums, a dental emergency can interfere with eating, speaking, or other day-to-day activities. According to the Canadian Dental Association, you can sometimes prevent dental emergencies like these by avoiding the use of your teeth as tools or by giving up hard foods and candies.

Even if you take excellent care of your mouth, however, unexpected dental problems can still arise. Our team at Whitemud Dental Centre is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to assess and resolve your individual situation. When an emergency arises, you should immediately make an appointment with our office so we can put you at ease, give you the best possible care, and help you return quickly to your regular routine.

Damaged Teeth

For tooth damage in particular, don’t hesitate to call and schedule an emergency dental appointment. You should come in as soon as possible. However, if you have some time before your appointment there are a few things you can do to avoid further injury. If you break your tooth, clean the area well by rinsing it with warm water. To ease any discomfort, put a cold compress against your skin near the area with the affected tooth.

A dislodged tooth should be handled carefully in order to keep it in the best possible condition. Gently rinse off the tooth without scrubbing it and try to place it back into the socket of your gums. If it won’t stay in your mouth, put the tooth in a container of milk and bring it along to your dental appointment.

Injured Soft Tissues

For other problems, such as bleeding gums or an injured tongue, cheek, or lip, our office recommends gently rinsing your mouth with salt water and applying pressure to the site with a moist strip of gauze or a tea bag. If you’re also experiencing some discomfort, you can put a cold compress on your cheek near the area of the bleeding. If the bleeding continues, don’t hesitate to contact our office so you can receive further help.

A dental emergency may catch you off guard, but Drs. Clair Miller, Leah Gully, and Kathryn Sandilands can provide fast, pain-free treatment. Follow the advice above and set up an appointment with us as soon as possible so you can put your teeth and mouth on the road to recovery.

How can Botox® help my smile?

August 26th, 2020

We all want to have a smile that makes us feel happy. We want to look in the mirror and feel good about ourselves. Botox has been used for several years to help reduce the appearance of lines, wrinkles, and folds caused by repetitive muscle contractions and old age. While Botox is commonly used to reduce crow’s feet (smile lines), frown lines, and wrinkles on the upper portion of the face, more people are using Botox to improve their smiles. If you’re looking to have a smile makeover, here are three ways Botox at our Edmonton, AB office can help.

Improving a Gummy Smile without Surgery

For years, dentists corrected a gummy smile with two surgical procedures: crown lengthening or gingivectomies. While both dental surgeries are relatively painless, they are intrusive; a dental laser removes excess gum and then sculpts and reshapes the gums into an even shape. Healing can take several weeks. However, you can also improve a gummy with Botox. How does it work? We inject Botox into the muscles that control and elevate the upper lip; this relaxes the muscles and allows them to hide more of the gums. There is no downtime to heal with this procedure, and you'll see results in 24 to 36 hours. In addition, a Botox treatment lasts six months, which means you won’t be coming back to see Drs. Clair Miller, Leah Gully, and Kathryn Sandilands for further restorations.

Fixing Upper and Lower Lip Lines

Upper and lower lips lines are sometimes called “smoker’s lines,” but age, genetics, excessive sun exposure, and a host of other things can also cause these lines to form. Botox injections between the lip and the skin will cause the orbicularis muscle to relax, which softens lip lines and greatly improves a person’s smile. Furthermore, Botox doesn’t just get rid of lip lines, but it also creates fuller and more youthful lips.

Changing a Down-turned Smile

Do you always look like you’re sad or frowning? Does your droopy smile make you self-conscious? An overactive depressor angulu oris, which is a muscle in the lower part of the face, can make it look like you have a down-turned smile. Botox can be injected to weaken the muscles that pull down the corners of the mouth, which in turn allows the corners of the lips to rise.

While Botox can give you a fuller and happier smile, be sure to consult with Drs. Clair Miller, Leah Gully, and Kathryn Sandilands about the best course of action.

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